The Best and Worst Flooring Materials for Family & Pets

Is it possible to have children, pets, and beautiful flooring? Yes—but you’ve got spills, muddy feet and the occasional pet “accident” working against you. You just want to find flooring material that meets your needs, like:

  1. Durability – The floors should be able to withstand untrimmed dog nails, kneading cats, and sippy cup spills.
  2. Easy to clean – In a house full of kids and pets, messes are going to happen. What’s important is that your flooring material is easy to mop, sweep, and clean with your preferred products.
  3. Safety – The right flooring for your family is safe, soft and slip-resistant. You also want to check that it doesn’t contain harmful chemicals—such as lead and phthalate.
  4. Visual appeal – It’s your home—you should enjoy your space! That means picking out flooring that makes you happy. Choose an appealing color and texture that compliments your space.
  5. Price – According to HomeAdvisor, it costs an average of about $2,900 to install flooring in your home. Since new flooring is a big investment, it’s best to pick a material that’s cost effective and will last a few decades.

Here are materials that do and don’t meet these specifications.

The Best

Bamboo Flooring

Bamboo floors are kid, pet, and earth friendly. Bamboo’s surface is hard (on par with maple and oak flooring) and extremely durable. It’s also stain resistant and can be easily cleaned using a mop, broom, or vacuum. And, its attractive exterior should be able to withstand scratches from toys and claws, making it the ideal choice for families.

Linoleum

Linoleum flooring makes the list because it’s easy to clean, fairly water resistant, quiet, and hypoallergenic (a must with stray furs flying around). And, since its color and print design extends from the surface into the base, it’s harder to detect scratches.

Vinyl

Vinyl flooring is among the most resilient flooring materials. Its tough surface will resist scratches, tear, and wear and is incredibly water resistant. And, it takes minimal maintenance to keep clean. Spills and stray hairs can be mopped, swept, or vacuumed away in minutes time and won’t leave long-lasting stains. Just be sure not to skimp on the price—cheap vinyl won’t offer the same durability and softness as higher end brands.

Tile or Stone

Tile flooring is a great option for families and pet owners because it can stand up to almost any mess or accident. It’s water resistant, stain resistant, and incredibly durable. Terra cotta and natural stone are beautiful and will compliment almost any home. One drawback is the relative hardness of the flooring—what makes it so easy to clean is also what makes it uncomfortable to sit and play on. Counteract this by adding a soft play rug to rooms where animals and kids gather and keep the beautiful flooring for yourself.

Rethink Carpet

While this is one of the most popular types of flooring, it has many qualities that children and pets love—it’s soft, warm, and slip resistant. However, it does a terrible job hiding pet accidents, fur and stains. It can also trap foul smelling odors! Even worse, looped cut carpet can catch on animal claws and cause a lot of pain. If you must have carpet, choose either polyester, nylon, or eco-friendly, triexta fibers. These types are known for their durability and stain resistance.

Choose Flooring That Will Last

Choosing the right flooring for your family is important—the floor is where you gather, play, and roam. Why spend that time worrying about spills and messes? The right flooring for your family will stand up to the chaos and provide a space for fun first.

 

Katy Caballeros is a freelance writer who enjoys scheming eclectic home design ideas for her apartment. She can usually be found with book and bottle of ginger beer on the weekends.

 

References

Source: Coldwell Banker Blue Matter Blog

Posted on October 3, 2017 at 9:01 am
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: cleaning, decorating, DIY, projects, real estate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

7 Things to Do Before Moving into Your New Home

The keys are yours, now what?

Congratulations! You’re a new homeowner. While you may not be able to wait to move in, there are a few things you should consider tackling before hanging those family photos on the walls.

lock

1. Change the locks – For peace of mind, it’s a good idea to change out the locks on your exterior doors to ensure that anyone the previous owners may have given a key to can no longer access the property. According to Home Advisor, the average homeowner spends between $100-$300 hiring a locksmith.

2. Paint – Don’t love the lemon yellow the previous homeowners chose for the master bedroom? Painting your new home will be infinitely easier if you can do so before moving furniture into the space. Head to your local paint store to pick up a few samples to test before committing. Take your time and be sure to view the color swatches in different lights before committing. There are also handy online visualization tool like the Benjamin Moore Personal Color Viewer.

floors

3. Take care of your floors – Like with painting, treating and refinishing floors is much easier without furniture in the way. Costs for this project will vary depending on the size of the job, but you can estimate roughly $200 for supplies and equipment. Check out this useful guide to refinishing wood floors from This Old House before heading to the hardware store.

repairs

4. Make any necessary repairs – Does the bathtub need to be re-caulked or the tile re-grouted? Do the floor boards creak? Make a list of priority repairs and tackle them one by one. You’ll be happy you did a few months from now when other projects crop up on the honey do list.

5. Clean from top to bottom – The only thing better than a new home is a clean new home. Now is the best time to give every nook and cranny of your home a deep clean. Scrub the inside of appliances like the refrigerator, oven, dishwasher and microwave. Wipe down walls and baseboards with a damp cloth. Looking for clever ways to banish grease and grime? Check out our Home Tip of the Day video series.

utilities

6. Set up your utilities – Call your electric, gas, cable and water utility providers to make sure service is transferred to you after closing. You’ll also want to research when trash and recycling pick-up are scheduled for your zone.

7. Change your Address – While you may want those mortgage bills to be sent elsewhere, it’s important to file a change of address with the US Postal Service to ensure that all mail is forwarded to your new address following your move. Also be sure to alert friends and family of your new address. They’ll need to know where to send that housewarming gift!

Now, the only thing left to do is celebrate! Looking for great housewarming party ideas? Try one of these backyard flings!

Posted on September 26, 2017 at 11:47 am
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: Buyers, Celebrate, closing costs, first time buyers, Homeowners, real estate, selling | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Simple Water-Saving Bathroom Upgrades

 

Guest post by Katy Caballeros 

Between the toilet, shower, and sink, your bathroom accounts for nearly 60% of your home’s water usage. With water scarcity estimated to affect 2/3 for the global population by 2025, water costs are bound increase. Make a water-saving change and an investment in the future, without sacrificing performance. Read about the three simple bathroom upgrades that have a positive impact on your wallet and the world.

1. Install a Low-Flow Faucet Aerator

Although a sink doesn’t seem to use as much water as the shower or toilet, it can pour out around 3 gallons of water per minute (gpm). Those extra gallons add up, especially if occasionally forget to turn off the sink while you shave or brush your teeth. By installing a low-flow faucet aerator on your bathroom sink, you can cut your water waste in half, reducing it by as much as 1,400 gallons per year. Purchasing an aerator for your sink is one of the cheapest conservation renos, with aerators available for as little as $1.

2. Switch Out Your Showerhead

It’s easy to waste water in the shower—many of us use the shower to relax or perhaps leave the water running as we wait for it to warm. While taking shorter showers can definitely help with water conservation, new energy-efficient showerheads can help reduce water waste without sacrificing enjoyment.

WaterSense labeled products are certified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to help save water and are worth consideration as you search for the right products for your home. Showerheads labeled “low flow” are another option for your bathroom reno, as they deliver 2.5 gpm instead of the wasteful 5 gpm of older showerheads.

Newer models, like Evolve’s showerheads, have features like smart home technology, which conserve water and reduce energy use. Here’s how it works: instead of wasting water as you wait for the shower to warm, this technology automatically reduces the water flow to a trickle when it reaches 95 degrees. When you’re ready to shower, you pull on the showerhead’s built in lever and the flow returns to normal. No more letting energy-burning hot water flow down the drain. They estimated this showerhead technology can save homeowners 2-6 gallons of water per shower!

3. Replace Your Old Toilet

The toilet is the most water-wasteful piece of plumbing in most homes. Nearly 1/3 of a household’s total water consumption is flushed down the toilet. They can use as much as 7 gallons per flush! Luckily, toilet technology has come a long way in the past few decades. Newer energy-saving models can reduce water waste up to 67%. There are three main types of water efficient toilets:

  1. Low Flow Toilets
  2. Duel Flush Toilets
  3. Pressure Assist Toilets

Some toilets use a combination of low flow, duel flush, and pressure assist to create a conservation-friendly commode. Low flow toilets are designed to use significantly less water than older models, whereas duel flush toilets customize each flush for either solid or liquid waste. Pressure-assist toilets use an air cartridge to push water from the tank, which means using as little as one gallon per flush. With thousands of gallons a year in water savings at stake, a toilet reno is a must for water-conscious homeowners.

HomeAdvisor surveyed homeowners and found that replacing a toilet cost an average of $377. Compare that to savings up to $2,200 over its lifespan, and that’s more than a 580% return on investment.

Luckily, with innovations in water-saving technology, it’s easy to drastically cut back on water consumption without sacrificing performance. And, compared to other home updates, purchasing and installing water-saving products is relatively cheap and promise big savings on your water and energy bills. Whether you’re conserving water for your wallet, the environment, or state regulations upgrading bathroom fixtures can make a positive impact.

Posted on September 25, 2017 at 8:54 am
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: appliances, decorating, energy, flood insurance, inspections, interior decorating, real estate, Utilities, watering | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Considering a Career in Real Estate?

What does it take to have a successful career in real estate? A Coldwell Banker young rising star shares his story.

Have you ever thought about a career in real estate, but aren’t sure you have what it takes? We caught up with Joe Piccininni, an agent with Coldwell Banker Beau Hulse Realty in the Hamptons and recipient of the Coldwell Banker 30 Under 30 award, to find out why he chose to become a real estate professional and how he has found success after just three years in the business.

What does Joe say it takes to be a good real estate agent? Dedication, authenticity and being a good listener. “People trust you when you’re being yourself…and this business is all about trust,” he says.

Hear how Joe got his start and the one thing he would tell anyone considering a career in real estate in the segment below, which first aired on NBC Open House.

Considering a career in real estate? Learn more at coldwellbanker.com/careers.

Source: Coldwell Banker Blue Matter

Posted on August 21, 2017 at 11:14 am
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: Buyer's Market, Buyers, buying, community, first time buyers, Homeowners, open houses, real estate, selling, travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Coldwell Banker at Inman Connect San Francisco 2017

Inman Connect San Francisco brings together more than 4,000 of the most important people in real estate including top-producing agents and brokers, CEOs of leading real estate franchises and tech entrepreneurs to embrace and leverage the change that surrounds real estate.

Coldwell Banker showed up big this year.  From the stage to the lobby Gen Blue was seen and heard – reminding the industry why it is real estate’s most iconic brand.

Below are some highlights from the week.

The President and CEO of Coldwell Banker, Charlie Young, gave an inspiring keynote from mainstage about how the Empowered Agent is  bringing positive disruption to real estate and is a force to be reckoned with.

Charlie also wrote a piece for Inman on how to identify, embrace and support these talented specialists as we look to the future.

A special group of empowered agents were highlighted on mainstage including Team Diva with Coldwell Banker Bain in Seattle. Pictured on-screen below is Kim V. Colaprete and Roy Powell.

Lindsay Listanski, Senior Manager Media Engagement for Coldwell Banker, ran a social media crash course on how to implement geographic marketing using Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

The audience ate it up and so did Inman. Lindsay’s presentation was packed full of how-tos, best practices and helpful tips on how to take your social media marketing to the next level and wow your sellers. You can catch her full presentation here.

David Marine, Senior Vice President of Marketing, predicted the future of real estate marketing. Spoiler alert: the future is video. He covered everything from local television advertising to how to effectively use video to bolster your listings. He also addressed how real estate brands should think about using tools like Zillow and Trulia to their advantage.

Coldwell Banker rounded out the week with a visit to the Nest Headquarters in Palo Alto.

Agents and brokers heard from Nest CMO Doug Sweeny about the future of the connected home and received a preview of what Nest is doing to support real estate Smart Home specialists.

Come back to CB Exchange for a new suite of marketing assets next month!

The networking and fun continued at the invite-only Coldwell Banker cocktail party – Smart Cocktails and Smart Conversations.

Even if you weren’t there in person you can catch up on everything you missed right here:

Coldwell Banker sales associates can also stay in the know with Gen Blue News. Now available on Amazon Alexa, just enable Gen Blue News on your Amazon Echo or Echo Dot and say “”Alexa, Open Gen Blue News” or download the podcast through iTunes.

And if you’re still having FOMO make sure to join us at Gen Blue and Inman Connect NYC!

Posted on August 18, 2017 at 2:26 pm
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: community, financing, first time buyers, Homeowners, market trends, real estate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 Tips to Selling an Inherited Property

Selling an inherited house can be draining. Coldwell Banker gives 4 tips on how to successfully prepare, organize and sell your inherited house.

One difficult topic real estate agents routinely have to discuss is about selling an inherited home from a parent when they pass away. It is a situation that is an overwhelming experience, one filled with emotions and many questions. While talking about it is difficult, it is smart to be prepared. This includes having conversations as a family to determine who will be included in the will to inherit the home, where the deed to the home is kept and where other paperwork is located.

After the estate has been settled and the home received as an inheritance, deciding to sell, rent or keep the home is the first step which will help determine what to do next. For those who decide to sell the home, it is a good idea to work with a team of professionals including a lawyer and a real estate agents who can offer advice and guidance throughout the process.

Although each situation is unique, the professionals at Coldwell Banker have provided the following four tips to help prepare to sell an inherited home:

Assemble a strong team of professionals. Working with a real estate agent, lawyer and potentially a tax specialist can help make the process of selling an inherited property go more smoothly. A team of professionals can give the guidance necessary to prepare the home for sale and get all of the affairs in order. A real estate agent can offer crucial, local market information that is especially helpful if the heir does not live nearby. Lawyers and tax specialists can help put all of the processes in order to ensure that selling the home is as easy on you and your family as possible.

Do a home walk through and get organized. Going from room to room and looking at everything from the condition of the floors to how fresh the paint looks can help determine what may need to be done to the home to help it sell more quickly. If the inherited property is older, a home inspection is important before making any decisions as there may be certain systems that need renovations. Equally important is to gather all of the necessary paperwork such as the deed to the home as well as researching whether there are any mortgages on the inherited property that need to be paid. Even if the original mortgage was paid off, a reverse mortgage may have been negotiated to help cover expenses. Also looking into local property taxes and when they were last paid is important.

Have the home appraised and price it correctly. Property received as an inheritance is not considered to be income by the beneficiary. The adjusted basis of a home is its fair market value at the time it was inherited, so it is important to get an accurate appraisal of the home. A real estate agent can also provide counsel on an appropriate listing price to match market value. Out-of-town beneficiaries can also find it difficult to select competent appraisers, inspectors and other professionals to assist in the home selling process, all of which a real estate agent can assist with.

Consider staging or other cosmetic improvements. Although not necessary in all markets or price ranges, home staging can be the difference in getting a home sold in a price-competitive market. An inherited property may not be furnished in the style of other local homes on the market selling at a similar price. A real estate agent can help determine whether or not home staging is a good fit for a specific situation. They may also suggest making home design improvements such as repainting rooms and/or landscaping the yard or other parts of the property. Make sure the lawn and landscaping look good and that the exterior of the house is in good condition. Low curb appeal can keep potential buyers from researching a home they may otherwise love. Perhaps most importantly, having an experienced real estate agent to answer questions quickly and accurately frees up time to devote to other activities and events.

Find more information on selling your home on the Coldwell Banker Blue Matter blog.

Source: Coldwell Banker Blue Matter blog

Posted on August 8, 2017 at 9:45 am
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: appraisal, Bidding, buying, Charity, closing, closing costs, curb appeal, distressed properties, Homeowners, investor, market trends, mortgage, open houses, real estate, Sellers Market, selling, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How To Win A Bidding War Without Overspending

Winning a bidding war requires tactful strategy. What’s your next move?

Right now we are in a Seller’s Market here in Solano County. Oftentimes that means multiple offers over list price. It can be a frustrating and exhausting process. Read on for strategic tips!

It’s possible to win a bidding war without paying a cent more than you budgeted for.

 How To Win A Bidding War With Multiple Offers On a House

  1.  Know what you can really afford

    As far as emotional purchases go, buying a home ranks right up there with choosing a wedding dress — only the financial stakes are much higher. Unless you know ahead of time exactly how much house you can afford, you could easily be sucked into spending too much. Your lender or financial adviser can help you determine that number. Then it’s time to play ball.

    “Submit your best and final offer early,” says Skyler Irvine, senior partner at Myriad Real Estate Group in Phoenix, AZ. “If $1,000 keeps you from pulling into the driveway of your dream home just because you wanted to play hardball, then you might regret this more than you can imagine.” But the flip side is also true. “If you get outbid because someone offered more than you were comfortable with spending, then you didn’t lose anything and made a smart financial decision.”

    Here’s a real-life strategy from a client of Naples, FL, agent Gordon Campbell on how to submit the best offer in a “best and final” situation without going too high: “They simply added a clause stating that they would pay $1,000 more than the next ‘best and final’ capped at the original price as seen in the MLS.” The outcome? “They got the property for slightly more than the other bidder.”

  2.  Talk with the listing agent

    You can put in an offer, but unless your agent makes the effort to speak with the listing agent, your offer, in a multiple offer scenario, will probably not stand out. Gary Hughes, a Virginia real estate agent, recently received 13 offers for a property he listed. “Twelve were just emailed, and the buyers’ agents did not speak to me,” he says. But one agent called and had the lender follow up. “The lender and the buyer’s agent were able to address a concern in a way that assured me it would get to settlement. It wasn’t the highest offer, but it was close. Those conversations made all the difference.”

  3.  Propose a shorter closing

    It’s always beneficial to find the seller’s motivation for selling (if you can). Let’s say they just accepted a new job in another part of the country. This seller is probably highly motivated to sell quickly. “If you can close the deal in two or three weeks, you may win over the higher offer that comes with a six-week closing period,” says Eric Bowlin, a real estate investor.

    But just how do you go about closing faster? Here’s one way: “Tighten up your inspection time frame so sellers know that they can get through to a closing date quicker,” says William Golightly, a Florida agent.
    Buyers can also be preapproved, or even better, get a conditional approval, from their lender. Going through the mortgage process first allows you to close just as fast as all-cash buyers do.

  4.  Rent the house back to the sellers

    Some sellers aren’t interested in a short closing at all. In fact, the opposite could be true. Sellers who don’t have to sell quickly but who are just making a change, such as downsizing or upsizing, might want a long closing or some sort of flexible deal to give them time to find their new home. “Being able to rent back the property to the seller for a few months while they solidify their next purchase can go a long way into not needing to overbid on the property,” says Aaron Norris, a California real estate investor with The Norris Group.

  5.  Submit an as is offer

    The fewer conditions you put on negotiating the house price, the more attractive you look to sellers. Consider offering to buy the house as-is. Miami Beach, FL, agent Jill Hertzberg says, “You can opt out of conducting inspections.” But since this is an extremely risky proposition, Hertzberg suggests instead of waiving the inspection altogether, decrease the inspection period to two days maximum. Lilia Biberman, a Boca Raton, FL, agent says to only waive the inspection “if you have a firm grasp of all the possible defects a property may possess and the costs associated with remedying those defects.” Also, if you’ll be paying in cash, you don’t need a financing contingency, which protects buyers who don’t secure financing in time.

    Source: Trulia Blog

 

Posted on July 21, 2017 at 12:28 pm
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: bid, Bidding, Bidding War, Multiple offers, real estate, Sellers Market, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

7 Things To Know Before Becoming A Landlord

Thinking about investing in a rental property?  Here are some great tips that will get you started!

First-time homebuyers are a declining group. Historically, 40% of homebuyers have been first-time buyers, but that percentage continues to shrink, even as millennials continue to show more interest in becoming buyers (eventually). If you’re already a homeowner, your wheels might be spinning right about now — if people aren’t buying starter homes, then the rental market has to be booming, right? It is in many areas, particularly where unemployment is low, the population is high, and homes are not overpriced. But before you start searching for a home for sale in Austin, TX to rent, you should think about the responsibility that comes with being a landlord — and learning by trial and error is not the best way to go about gathering intel (or a steady income).

Before you take the plunge, study up on how to become a landlord with these seven tips.

  1.  Ideally, you want to live near your rental property

    Living close to your property allows you to check on it periodically (after giving your tenants proper notice), take care of repairs yourself, and show the property when it’s time to list it for rent again. Research the best investment areas — but even if you don’t live in a prime rental region, you can still invest in one by hiring a property manager to take care of day-to-day details.

  2.  Know landlord-tenant law

    Most states have specific landlord-tenant provisions that cover issues such as security deposits, level of access to the property, and how much notice you need to give your tenants when you want them to leave. There also are federal laws you need to know, such as habitability and anti-discrimination laws. “Many landlords gloss over housing discrimination laws because they assume that as long as they’re not racist or sexist, they needn’t worry about fair-housing violations,” says Ron Leshnower, real estate attorney and author of Fair Housing Helper for Apartment ProfessionalsBut fair-housing liability traps can arise in many ways, so it’s important that you fully understand the law and ensure that you aren’t breaking it.

  3.  Make sure you can enforce that the rent is paid on time

    This seems like a no-brainer, but believe me, if you get too friendly with your tenants, you might just let them slide a couple of weeks beyond the first of the month, or allow a partial payment when they’re between jobs. Before you know it, your tenants are six months behind and you’re struggling to make the mortgage payments. But being firm doesn’t mean you shouldn’t treat tenants with respect. Cultivating a good relationship with your tenants often goes a long way to ensure rent will be paid on time and that repair requests will be easier to deal with.

  4.  Screen potential tenants

    It’s worth the time to do a background and credit check on all potential tenants: online tenant-screening services are convenient, and you should be sure to check potential tenants’ credit scores. A credit score alone shouldn’t be the sole reason to accept or deny an applicant, but it is a useful screening tool: For instance, if your renter is fresh out of college with a solid job offer, they may not have enough credit history to warrant a good score—but could be a great rental candidate.

    You should also conduct an interview to make sure you’re comfortable interacting with them, and check references, especially from employers or past landlords. But be advised, it’s hard to find the perfect tenant. According to Casey Fleming, author of The Loan Guide: How to Get the Best Possible Mortgage, it’s important to have a thick skin, and advises people not to buy rental property if tenant shenanigans will “drive you crazy.” Case in point: Fleming once had an evicted tenant break into the house, change the locks, and move back in!

  5.  Customize the lease

    If you don’t hire an attorney or a property manager, you can use a standard lease form from Nolo, for example, but you should tweak it to fit your situation. For example, if you allow pets, specify how many, what kind, and any rules that apply. Your lease could state that tenants should leash their dogs when outside the fenced-in yard and stipulate that pets should not become a nuisance to neighbors.

  6.  Inspect the property regularly

    “Have language regarding inspections clearly written in your lease documents,” says Timmi Ryerson, CEO of Smart Property Systems. She suggests taking pictures to establish a baseline (and document the move-in condition) and conducting an inspection at three months. If you find problems, Ryerson recommends that landlords “issue a notice to comply and set another inspection in one week.”

  7.  Understand this is not a get-rich-quick scheme

    Being a landlord is not just sitting around collecting a big wad of cash each month. You’ll need to spend some money to ready the property for tenants, buy landlord insurance, and pay property taxes. If you’re taking out a mortgage, be prepared to fork over at least a 20% down payment. Think of being a landlord as part of your overall investment strategy and be realistic about your goals — most landlords aim for about a 5% return on their investments.

    Source: Trulia Blog

 

Posted on July 20, 2017 at 8:06 pm
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: buying, first time buyers, investing, investor, Landlord, real estate, rental, rentals, tenants, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

What to Consider Before Buying a Home on the Golf Course

Traditionally considered the ultimate location, here is what you need to know before you purchase a home on the golf course!

Is there anything on par with living on a golf course?

Before you buy that home on the fairway, there are a few things to consider. From maintenance to memberships, privacy to views, life on the golf course comes with a few questions. To settle the score, we turned to our golf pro, Cara Ameer with Coldwell Banker Vanguard Realty, Inc. to learn her tips for what to consider before buying a home of the golf course. In the segment below, which first aired on NBC Open House, Cara explains how to tee your home search up for success and avoid any bunkers along the way.

To find a home on the green, visit Kappelgateway.com. You can find golf properties around the world using the lifestyle search found in the top navigation of the site.

Source:  CB Blue Matter

Posted on July 20, 2017 at 7:46 pm
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: buying, Golf, Golf Course, real estate, Resale Value, selling, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Five Tips to Identify Fixer-Upper Homes Worth Investing In

You may know someone who did very well during the market crash in 2008 purchasing fixers. Its a complex issue that you need to study up on before you even consider taking that plunge!

When shopping for a fixer-upper home, some properties have potential beyond their appearance. Keep the following tips in mind as you look for that home.

When shopping for a new home, be aware of properties that have potential beyond their current appearance. Home buyers often overlook a great property because they are too focused on the cosmetic appeal, which can be easily altered. Keep the following tips in mind as you search for your perfect home:

  1. Finding the Best Neighborhood for You
    Location is one of the most crucial factors to consider as you look for possible homes. Unlike the style and even structure, no amount of time, effort, or money can change a home’s location. To find the best neighborhood for you, it can help to visit the area multiple times at various hours. This will help reveal the local culture and activity to be expected from neighbors.
  2. Identify a Cost-Efficient Fixer-Upper Home
    Look for a home with sound fundamentals and an appealing floor plan. Cosmetic improvements like new paint, lighting fixtures, and flooring are relatively cheap and easy to change, while work on plumbing, electrical systems, structural walls, or cabinets are more difficult and expensive. Typically, the most expensive change involves altering a home’s structure.
  3.  Hire a Contractor Before Buying a Home
    You may want to hire a contractor in your search if you know you want to make changes to a home you plan to purchase. A contractor can help you better understand what kind of commitment a given home will require. Many remodelers will visit a potential purchase at no charge to give an estimate of how much the work would cost. This is valuable information when comparing different homes with one another.
  4. Know What to Check Before Buying an Old Home
    Examining a home can be a complex process, and looking for one with unused potential can make it more difficult. Keep in mind that homes older than 50 years are likely to have similarly aged plumbing, electrical, heating, and other systems. The home may also be worn out or too outdated to remodel.
  5. Real Estate Agents Can Help
    Real estate agents are valuable resources. They can help you understand a home in the context of its neighborhood and area, and may be able to offer advice on how to increase the value of the property after purchase.

Source:  CB Blue Matter

 

Posted on July 20, 2017 at 7:40 pm
Kappel Gateway Realty | Category: buying, distressed properties, Fixer Uppers, Fixers, Foreclosures, investor, real estate, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,